Skip to content

Florida Bonneted Bat

Eumops floridanus

Background

The Florida bonneted bat is found nowhere in the world but south Florida. At night they fly high in the sky, feeding on insects. During the day, they sleep in pine and palm tree cavities, beneath barrel tile roofs, and in bat houses. They are listed as endangered in the United States.

Micaela Jemsion / Bat Conservation International
Micaela Jemsion / Bat Conservation International

Current Threats

Loss of habitat is their biggest threat,
including the destruction of natural roost
sites and hurricane damage.

How You Can Help

  • Report sightings to aid researchers
  • Attend a local Bat Walk to learn more about this species
  • Plant native flowers to attract insects
  • Spread the word about Bat Week!

 

fbb_map

Fun Facts

They are the largest bat species in Florida, about the size of a chipmunk.

Attend a local Bat Walk to learn more  protecting our crops and lowering about this species pesticide use.

Females typically only give birth to one pup each year.

Learn more by visiting FloridaBonnetedBat.org

Faces of Bat Week

Townsend big-eared bat

Townsend's big-eared bats are a charismatic species with marvelously large ears and prominent, bilateral nose lumps.

Florida bonneted bat

The Florida bonneted bat is found nowhere in the world but South Florida.

Indiana bat

Indiana bats are a small insect-eating bats that live in North America.

Northern long-eared bat

The northern long-eared bat is a species of bat native to North America. There are no recognized subspecies.

Mexican long-nosed bat

The Mexican long-nosed bat is federally endangered and relies on nectar from agave to make long migrations through Mexico and the southwest United States.